Dating fenton carnival glass

dating fenton carnival glass

How much is Fentons carnival glass worth?

Fentons carnival glass was first marketed as the golden sunset iridescent assortment in catalogs. In 1907 when these pieces first sold, they cost 85 cents. A Fenton autumn acorns bowl averages for about $65. You can find some selling for as much as $150.

How do you find the date on a Fenton Glass?

Finding Fenton Markings Check for a sticker on the bottom of your item. Examine carnival glass for an oval logo starting from about 1970. Check for a small number in the oval that denotes the year. Examine the piece for a cursive F in an oval. Check for a flame or a star on the piece.

How did Fenton start making glassware?

Initially they focused on painting “blank” glassware. But eventually, they moved to West Virginia, which had the raw materials needed for glass production, and began producing their own glassware–with great success. Fenton entered the glass market in 1908 with the introduction of what later became known as “carnival” glass.

When did carnival glass return to the market?

Fenton announced the return of Carnival Glass in 1970. The company made the decision to trademark their modern output of Carnival with the word Fenton in script in an oval cartouche - see far left - so that collectors of early Classic Fenton Carnival, which was unmarked, could tell the difference.

How much is a Fenton carnival glass bowl worth?

Fentons carnival glass was first marketed as the golden sunset iridescent assortment in catalogs. In 1907 when these pieces first sold, they cost 85 cents. A Fenton autumn acorns bowl averages for about $65. You can find some selling for as much as $150. Earlier Fenton specimens, up through 1920, can fetch a high price.

When did Fenton stop making carnival glass?

During the Great Depression, the company stopped the production of carnival glass and introduced a wide range of decorative and household lines. In the 1930s, Fenton Art Glass Company produced Hobnail pieces for other glass manufacturers. In 1939-1940, Fenton introduced its own milk glass Hobnail line.

What kind of Glass did the Fenton Glass Company make?

They produced three colors mostly; marigold, amethyst, and green and they were mostly bowls and water sets. Their most sought-after carnival glass and rarest of glass is the Millersburg People’s Vase. The first year for glass production for the Fenton Glass Company was 1907.

How much is a Fenton hobnail vase worth?

A Fenton hobnail 4 1/2-inch vase can go for $15 to $50. The older it is, the higher in cost. Opalescent or iridescent glass can be worth more. Hobnail glass was popular in Victorian times, then, it was called dewdrop glass.. When Fenton introduced it in 1939, it became a hit.

When did they stop making carnival glass?

Most U.S. carnival glass was made before 1925, with production in clear decline after 1931. Some important production continued outside the US through the depression years of the early 1930s, tapering off to very little by the 1940s.

Does Fenton still make carnival glass?

After interest waned in the late 1920s, Fenton stopped producing carnival glass for many years. In more recent years, due to a resurgence in interest, Fenton restarted production of carnival glass until its closure in 2007. Most U.S. carnival glass was made before 1925, with production in clear decline after 1931.

What is carnival glass and who made it?

Collecting Carnival Glass and a short history of the companies that produced it, such as Fenton and Northwood. Carnival glass was first produced in the early nineteen hundreds and is a range of patterned, pressed glass suffused with an iridescent lustre, which reflects the light and makes the glass surface gleam with metallic highlights.

How do I know if my Carnival glass is real?

Compare it to a real piece of carnival glass to check. However, its important to note that real carnival glass came in a variety of matter and shiny finishes. Less detail - Many fakes have less detailed and intricate designs and thicker glass. If it feels clumsy, it may not be real.

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